“Decision Makers”

A recent report from a government backed initiative indicates that the arts have “zero” impact on the economy. 

What Works, a government supported project that brands itself “evidence for decision makers”, has released a report suggesting that arts and culture make no economic contribution to the country. This report follows a long-standing debate regarding the value of the arts in our society. The report shows that although the arts contribute human interest and value to society, the economic contribution made by the sector is relatively low.

Arts funding has been a battle ground with every government in the past twenty years, naysayers often being put in their place with claims that the arts offers not only cultural but also financial value to the community. What Works claim that this is inaccurate and “Given the significant cost of most major sport and culture projects they are unlikely to be cost-effective in terms of increasing local economic growth”. The benefits of tourism are also “short-lived” it reported.

This report comes in shocking opposition to that of the On with the Show: Supporting Local Arts and Culture‘s report in the summer of this year. Arts Council England found economic growth to be the number one reason for investment in the arts locally. Conversely, What Works report “We found no robust evidence on the economic impacts of smaller projects”, and project that it is likely to be even smaller than the impact made by the larger scale projects.

Is this a case of numbers trying to measure the creative immeasurable? Is this an illuminating revelation in data that should change the way we think about funding? Is this a case of 73.6% of all statistics are made up? Let me know what you think in the comments below!

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